Photo: Mike Turner

If you'd like to hear more about the walks, you can listen to Ann and presenter Caz Graham taking a shorewalk together for BBC Radio4's Open Country.

All walks will start from Allonby, for Dubmill Point – initial meeting place the car-park opposite Twentyman’s shop – to enjoy the Allonby Bay Marine Conservation Zone.

The terrain on the lower shore is slightly rocky, often slippery and always wet, so wellies are essential! Bring walking-poles if you feel happier using them.

Please note that – in very rare circumstances - weather and other factors might force cancellation, so please give me your phone number when you book.

Dates and times for 2018:

April: Wednesday 18th. Meet at 0800h (LW ~ 0830h). To reserve a place call 016973 21967 or use the contact form


June: Sunday 17th. Meet at 0900h (LW~0945h) To reserve a place call 016973 21967 or use the contact form


August: Sunday 12th (part of the National Marine Weeks). Meet at 0715h (LW~0745h). This walk is being organised on behalf of Cumbria Wildlife Trust; tel. 01539 816300; email mail@cumbriawildlifetrust.org.uk   Cost: adult £3, children half-price


August: Tuesday 14th. Meet at 0830h. (LW ~0920h). To reserve a place call 016973 21967 or use the contact form


September: Wednesday 12th. Meet at 0830h (LW~0900h). To reserve a place call 016973 21967 use the contact form
 

NEW! This year I will also be running a creative writing  day (fiction and non-fiction) about saltmarshes - for Cumbria Wildlife Trust at RSPB Campfield on the Upper Solway - on Saturday May 19th, 10am-4pm. We'll spend time out on the saltmarsh, and then indoors in the Solway Wetlands Centre.

Full details and explanation are on my Solway Shore-walker blog and booking details are also on CWT's 'Events' pages.

 

Tidal information from TideTimes website,
and Laver's Liverpool Tide Table (with corrections for BST and Silloth). Note that heights also vary depending on weather, wind and atmospheric pressure.

If you'd like to know more about why the Solway's best low tides are always at fairly unsociable hours, there's an explanation on my blog.